Collection System Information


The first step in treating wastewater is transporting waste to the treatment facility. A wastewater collection system, as its name implies, is a network of underground pipes designed to carry wastewater from homes and businesses, to where the water can be treated and recycled. On the average, each person using the system sends from 50 to 100 gallons of wastewater per day. Some businesses within our treatement area send tens of thousands of gallons per day.

The Collection System, as we know it today, is a combination of the now-merged College-Harris and Patton-Ferguson Joint Authorities. Each of these former Collection Authorities built, operated, and maintained a wastewater collection system to provide service for their respective municipalities. The majority of this system was constructed about 30 years ago and has been extended annually by land developers, who have dedicated each newly built extension for UAJA. In late 1998 they merged with the University Area Joint Authority, the regional wastewater treatment facility. This effort puts the collection and treatment of much of the Centre Region’s wastewater under the auspices of one entity. This merger not only makes our job easier, but also reduces the rates we must charge our customers for wastewater treatment.

There are approximately 250 miles of mainline sewers, ranging in size from 8" diameter to 36" diameter. There are also approximately 5400 manholes in the system which range in depth from 4’ to 22’. Wherever possible, wastewater is carried by gravity flow, but dispersed throughout the region are 18 lift (pumping) stations which lift the flow from a deep sewer and send it to a shallower sewer so that the gravity flow may continue to it’s destination at the treatment facility. The collection system maintains the flow of sanitary wastewater only, and is not intended to, nor does it carry any stormwater.